GG Book Club: Winners Take All
Jun
2
1:00 PM13:00

GG Book Club: Winners Take All

Former New York Times columnist Anand Giridharadas takes us into the inner sanctums of a new gilded age, where the rich and powerful fight for equality and justice any way they can--except ways that threaten the social order and their position atop it. We see how they rebrand themselves as saviors of the poor; how they lavishly reward "thought leaders" who redefine "change" in winner-friendly ways; and how they constantly seek to do more good, but never less harm. We hear the limousine confessions of a celebrated foundation boss; witness an American president hem and haw about his plutocratic benefactors; and attend a cruise-ship conference where entrepreneurs celebrate their own self-interested magnanimity.

Giridharadas asks hard questions: Why, for example, should our gravest problems be solved by the unelected upper crust instead of the public institutions it erodes by lobbying and dodging taxes? He also points toward an answer: Rather than rely on scraps from the winners, we must take on the grueling democratic work of building more robust, egalitarian institutions and truly changing the world. A call to action for elites and everyday citizens alike.

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Apr
7
1:00 PM13:00

Book Club- The Other Side of Freedom, DeRay McKesson

Join us for our April book club meeting!!!

"In August 2014, twenty-nine-year-old activist DeRay Mckesson stood with hundreds of others on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri, to push a message of justice and accountability. These protests, and others like them in cities across the country, resulted in the birth of the Black Lives Matter movement. Now, in his first book, Mckesson lays down the intellectual, pragmatic, and political framework for a new liberation movement. Continuing a conversation about activism, resistance, and justice that embraces our nation's complex history, he dissects how deliberate oppression persists, how racial injustice strips our lives of promise, and how technology has added a new dimension to mass action and social change. He argues that our best efforts to combat injustice have been stunted by the belief that racism's wounds are history, and suggests that intellectual purity has curtailed optimistic realism. The book offers a new framework and language for understanding the nature of oppression. With it, we can begin charting a course to dismantle the obvious and subtle structures that limit freedom.

Honest, courageous, and imaginative, On the Other Side of Freedom is a work brimming with hope. Drawing from his own experiences as an activist, organizer, educator, and public official, Mckesson exhorts all Americans to work to dismantle the legacy of racism and to imagine the best of what is possible. Honoring the voices of a new generation of activists, On the Other Side of Freedom is a visionary's call to take responsibility for imagining, and then building, the world we want to live in." -Amazon

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March Book Club: Heartland By Sarah Smarsh
Mar
10
1:00 PM13:00

March Book Club: Heartland By Sarah Smarsh

Join us Sunday March 10th as we discuss Heartland by Sarah Smarsh! Our discussion will begin at 1pm!

"In this furious, regretful, and loving memoir, Sarah Smarsh examines the life of America’s rural poor through the microcosm of her extended family. Growing up working-class white on the Kansas plains, Smarsh enjoyed the freedom of a country childhood, but witnessed the hideous legacy of poverty in her relatives’ untreated illnesses, unsafe job conditions, abusive marriages, and addictions to everything from cigarettes to opioids.

Smarsh, now a writer and professor, created a stable professional life for herself using the same work ethic she saw in her parents, with talents they themselves might have developed had they been able to continue in school. What made the biggest difference: federal grants for first-generation students, and her determination to avoid early pregnancy. Her life’s work, she felt, “was to be heard,” rather than to become a mother, though the daughter she might have had feels so real that Heartland takes the form of an anguished letter to her.

For Smarsh, one of the cruelest blows the poor suffer is society’s assessment that they somehow deserve less than others. “People of all backgrounds experience a sense of poorness—not enough of this or that thing that money can’t buy. But financial poverty is the one shamed by society, culture, unchecked capitalism, public policy, our very way of speaking.” Heartland will make you check your privilege before you refer to anyone as “white trash” or “red neck,” and if you’re standing at a polling station, you might hear Smarsh’s voice in your ear. Her portrayal of what it feels like to be poor in America will persuade you that it’s not a fate any child should be born into. —Sarah Harrison Smith, Amazon Book Review"

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Souper Heroes and New Product Launch for Women Crafting change
Mar
7
6:00 PM18:00

Souper Heroes and New Product Launch for Women Crafting change

Join us from 6-8pm at Global Gallery for an evening of soup and community in their beautiful Fair Trade coffee shop and art gallery located at 3535 N. High St., Columbus, OH 43214.

What's Souper Heroes? So glad you asked. Enjoy all the complimentary soup and bread you want and take advantage of the opportunity to pay it forward into our Donation Slow Cooker benefiting Women Crafting Change. We will be celebrating our new shea butter lotion chip launch! We can’t wait for you to try some samples and enjoy some soup!

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Friends and Family & December Art Opening
Dec
8
8:30 AM08:30

Friends and Family & December Art Opening

Hello Friends and Family! On Saturday December 8th we are celebrating you and your continued support for Global Gallery and offering you 20% off all retail purchases all day! Stop in and pick up fair trade gifts for the people on your list or maybe treat yourself! 
We will have 20% off all day 

From 2-4pm we will have a donation based Make and take to build your own wreath, all money will be donated to Women Crafting Change. This group is our December featured artist group. 

From 5-8pm we will have a Dj, $3 cans of Rhinegeist and will be showcasing the art of Women Crafting change! 

Stop by for a fun filled day!

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November Book Club- When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel Pink
Nov
4
1:00 PM13:00

November Book Club- When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing by Daniel Pink

Join us for our November Book of the month! 

How many of us come back from a lunch break with the best of intentions for an industrious end to the day, only to suffer the dreaded post-lunch slump? Pink lays out the scientific case for this phenomena, a peak, trough, and then recovery of energy levels and productivity seen in people worldwide, across all cultures and geographies. By being aware of one’s own chronotype, i.e. when they tend to experience peak and diminished performance, (for the record, I’m writing this review right before lunch), Pink argues readers can be more effective in choosing when to tackle a new project at work, when to give a big presentation, or even when to schedule a surgery. --Matt Fyffe

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October Book Club: Pachinko by  Min Jin Lee
Oct
7
1:00 PM13:00

October Book Club: Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

Join us for our October Book Club meeting!

Beginning in 1910 during the time of Japanese colonialization and ending many decades later in 1989, Pachinko is the epic saga of a Korean family told over four generations. The family’s story starts with Hoonie, a young Korean man born with physical deformities, but whose destiny comes from his inner strength and kindness. Hoonie’s daughter, rather than bring shame on her family, leaves their homeland for Japan, where her children and grandchildren will be born and raised; yet prejudice against their Korean heritage will prevent them from ever feeling at home. In Pachinko, Min Jin Lee says much about success and suffering, prejudice and tradition, but the novel never bogs down and only becomes richer, like a sauce left simmering hour after hour. Lee’s exceptional story of one family is the story of many of the world’s people. They ask only for the chance to belong somewhere—and to be judged by their hearts and actions rather than by ideas of blood traits and bad seeds. --Seira Wilson, The Amazon Book Review

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Artist Reception:  Jodi Kushins "In the Footsteps of a Farmer: Fleeting Beauty"
Sep
14
6:00 PM18:00

Artist Reception: Jodi Kushins "In the Footsteps of a Farmer: Fleeting Beauty"

 

"As urban farmer and educator, I’m interested in the power of art to inspire individuals to reflect on their lives and imagine new possibilities. The past five years I have been capturing and sharing moments of fleeting beauty I witness at Over the Fence Urban Farm, a long-range project that combines creative placemaking and sustainable living
Growing food can be a beautiful thing, both as a process and a product. A craft once passed from generation to generation, viewed through the lenses of climate change and agricultural engineering, one might consider backyard edible gardening a dying art form worthy of cultural heritage preservation. Through this exhibition and my ongoing work on the farm, I hope to encourage viewers to reconsider economist E. F. Schumacher's theory that "small is beautiful" when it comes to growing food and communities." -Jodi Kushins

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Global Book Club Meet Up
Sep
9
1:00 PM13:00

Global Book Club Meet Up

For our September book club meet up we will be reading Barracoon: The Story of the Last "Black Cargo" by Zora Neale Hurston.

" In 1927, Zora Neale Hurston went to Plateau, Alabama, just outside Mobile, to interview 86-year-old Cudjo Lewis. Of the millions of men, women, and children transported from Africa to America as slaves, Cudjo was then the only person alive to tell the story of this integral part of the nation's history. Hurston was there to record Cudjo's firsthand account of the raid that led to his capture and bondage 50 years after the Atlantic slave trade was outlawed in the United States.

In 1931, Hurston returned to Plateau, the African-centric community three miles from Mobile founded by Cudjo and other former slaves from his ship. Spending more than three months there, she talked in depth with Cudjo about the details of his life. During those weeks, the young writer and the elderly formerly enslaved man ate peaches and watermelon that grew in the backyard and talked about Cudjo's past - memories from his childhood in Africa, the horrors of being captured and held in a barracoon for selection by American slavers, the harrowing experience of the Middle Passage packed with more than 100 other souls aboard the Clotilda, and the years he spent in slavery until the end of the Civil War.

Based on those interviews, featuring Cudjo's unique vernacular, and written from Hurston's perspective with the compassion and singular style that have made her one of the preeminent American authors of the 20th-century, Barracoon brilliantly illuminates the tragedy of slavery and of one life forever defined by it. Offering insight into the pernicious legacy that continues to haunt us all, black and white, this poignant and powerful work is an invaluable contribution to our shared history and culture." Amazon

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Art Reception: Alfredo A. Weeks
Aug
31
6:00 PM18:00

Art Reception: Alfredo A. Weeks

 

A true native of the world who was born in Washington D.C, Alfredo Weeks takes an inward perspective while giving an out-ward embrace when it comes to design, creative strategy and fine arts. Panamanian heritage with an influence of Afro-Caribbean and Arab cultures have allowed vibrant colors, bold strokes to dominate the aesthetics of Alfredo's work.

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Global Book Club Meet Up
Aug
5
1:00 PM13:00

Global Book Club Meet Up

For Augusts book club meeting we will be discussing Ghosts of the Tsunami: The Life and Death in Japans Disaster Zone. by Richard Loyd Parry

"On March 11, 2011, a powerful earthquake sent a 120-foot-high tsunami smashing into the coast of northeast Japan. By the time the sea retreated, more than eighteen thousand people had been crushed, burned to death, or drowned.

It was Japan’s greatest single loss of life since the atomic bombing of Nagasaki. It set off a national crisis and the meltdown of a nuclear power plant. And even after the immediate emergency had abated, the trauma of the disaster continued to express itself in bizarre and mysterious ways.

Richard Lloyd Parry, an award-winning foreign correspondent, lived through the earthquake in Tokyo and spent six years reporting from the disaster zone. There he encountered stories of ghosts and hauntings, and met a priest who exorcised the spirits of the dead. And he found himself drawn back again and again to a village that had suffered the greatest loss of all, a community tormented by unbearable mysteries of its own.

What really happened to the local children as they waited in the schoolyard in the moments before the tsunami? Why did their teachers not evacuate them to safety? And why was the unbearable truth being so stubbornly covered up?

Ghosts of the Tsunami is a soon-to-be classic intimate account of an epic tragedy, told through the accounts of those who lived through it. It tells the story of how a nation faced a catastrophe, and the struggle to find consolation in the ruins." Amazon

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